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All About Poodles

Average sizes and life expectancy of the breed.

Height

over 15 inches (standard)

Weight

60-70 pounds (male standard)

40-50 pounds (female standard)

Life Expectancy

10-18 years

The Standard Poodle stands proudly among dogdom's true aristocrats. Beneath the curly, low-allergen coat is an elegant athlete and companion for all reasons and seasons.

Standards are the largest variety of the Poodle breed, growing to more than 15 inches tall at the shoulder and weighing between 35 and 75 pounds.  At dog shows, Poodles are usually seen in the elaborate Continental clip. Most pet owners prefer the simpler Sporting clip, in which the coat is shorn to follow the outline of the squarely built, smoothly muscled body.  

 

Forget any preconceived notions about Poodles you may have: Poodles are eager, athletic, and wickedly smart dogs of remarkable versatility. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best all-around athlete of the family, and can be trained with great success.

History of Poodles

 

The Poodle is the national dog of France, and the French sure do love their Poodles. There is, however, no such breed as the “French Poodle.” In France, Poodles are known as the Caniche, or “duck dog.”

Despite the Poodle’s association with France, the breed originated as a duck hunter in Germany, where the word “pudelin” refers to splashing in water. The Standard Poodle began its development as a retrieving water dog more than 400 years ago. With a crisp, curly coat as protection against the elements, superlative swimming ability, and off-the-charts intelligence, the Poodle was, and still is, a magnificent retriever. (The Standard and Miniature varieties are classified as a non-sporting dog and are eligible for AKC Retriever and Spaniel Hunting Tests).

The flamboyant Poodle show coat served a practical purpose in the breed’s early years. Hunters wanted their dogs to have free range of movement in the water, but they also wished to protect vital areas of the anatomy from the cold. They shaved the legs, neck, and tail but left the chest, hips, and leg joints coated. The rounded tufts on the legs, hips, and tail tip are called pompons. (Note the spelling: Cheerleaders have pom-poms; Poodles have pompons.)

The Poodle’s many fine qualities allowed it to move from the lake to the lap of luxury. Elegant Poodles of the Standard and Miniature varieties found favor among the nobles of France and, eventually, all of Europe. The breed’s showy looks and trainability made it a natural entertainer, and Poodles have long been associated with the European circus tradition. An excellent nose brought the Poodle additional work as a truffle hunter.

Stedman, Jade & Stelle - all retired now.
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